Tag Archives: New

Released next month: The Corpse-Rat King by Lee Battersby

Due for Release in September 2012

The Corpse-Rat King by Lee Battersby

The Corpse-Rat KingThe Corpse-Rat King by Lee Battersby

Marius don Hellespont and his apprentice, Gerd, are professional looters of battlefields. When they stumble upon the corpse of the King of Scorby and Gerd is killed, Marius is mistaken for the monarch by one of the dead soldiers and is transported down to the Kingdom of the Dead.

Just like the living citizens, the dead need a King — after all, the King is God’s representative, and someone needs to remind God where they are.

And so it comes to pass that Marius is banished to the surface with one message: if he wants to recover his life he must find the dead a King. Which he fully intends to do.

Just as soon as he stops running away.

UK/RoW
6 Sep 2012
B-format paperback
£7.99 UK
ISBN 9780857662866

US/CAN
28 Aug 2012
mass-market paperback
$7.99 US $8.99 CAN
ISBN 9780857662873

eBook
28 Aug 2012
£5.49
ePub ISBN 9780857662880

The ebook is available from The Robot Trading Company once The Corpse-Rat King is released. The print books I presume will be available in all the usual places; the publishers don’t say!

Published by Angry Robot, The Corpse-Rat King sounds to be an intriguing story with plenty of action, both natural and supernatural, on the way. This is on my “look-for” list!

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Tuesday Totals (8) 2012: Week 33

Tuesday Totals – 13 to 19 August 2012

Here is my weekly round-up of my blog activities – accomplished and planned – that I use to try to keep myself on track, focused and with a sense of achievement! There are seven sections of activities; this post details their status for the weeks 13 to 19 August 2012.

Currently Reading

The books I’m reading as I post.

1. Cameron Nation by David Carraturo (AG)

This is going on the back burner for a few weeks; I have some other books that have run up the list.

2. Luke Wood presents More than a Million Words by Luke Wood and others (FR)

I think a few of these before bed will be a nice treat.  I try not to read too many in one go, so I can savour each piece.

3. The Consul at Sunset by Gerald Hanley

We’ve now met a different character – at odds with the Establishment types, but bound to play by the rules.

4. The River Witch by Kimberly Brock (NG)

Totally absorbing – I couldn’t believe I’d read nearly half of it in one sitting – over dinner!

Finished This week

1. Wolf Dawn by Susan Cartwright (AG)

The story is totally absorbing.  The writing style is a little ponderous, but the universe building is good.  I enjoyed the ethical dilemas that afflict the characters..

2. Timepiece by Myra McEntire (NG)

 I enjoyed this.  Although having read Book 1 in the series might have helped, it works as a standalone book.

Reviews in Manuscript

I like writing with a pen (or pencil) and paper. In addition, it is more convenient to write by hand, since in the time available, I don’t have access to a computer 🙂
Look out for these reviews coming soon:

1. Defying Drakon by Carole Mortimer
2. Hot Girl’s Friend by Lisa Scott
3. Scarlett’s by A. L. Collins
4. The Serpent Sea by Martha Wells
5. The Wedding Story by Dee Tenorio
6. Little Girls: A Novella by Elton Lord
7. Unforgettable Embrace by Joanne Clancy
8. Dead(ish) by Naomi Kramer
9. A Vampire’s Dominon by V. M. K. Fewings
10. Bone Machine by C. N. James
11. Columbus Avenue Boys by David Carraturo
12. Catestrophically Consequential by Stephen C. Bird
13. The Hero’s Guide to Saving Your Kingdom by Christopher Healy
14. Darker by Degree by Keri Knutson & Susan Branham
15. Sanctuary by Glyn Smith-Wild
16. Seven into the Bleak by Matthew Iden
17. Redhead by Ian Cook
18. Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein
19. Wolf Dawn by Susan Cartwright

Reviews Posted

 The Assassin’s Curse by Cassandra Rose Clarke

TBR Shortlist

I’ve had a rethink on choosing my next book.  I have been approved for quite a number of NetGalley (NG) book, so I’ve decided it’s time to boost some of these up the list and get posting reviews!  The other books from my list generally come under the headings of author gifts (AG), which usually get priority; First Reads (FR) wins; and authors’ time limited free offers (FO).  I sprinkle in some bought books and free ebooks too, as I fancy.

My immediate reading list is:

1. For That Day by Low Kay Hwa (AG)
3. One Moment by Kristina McBride (NG)
4. Monkey with a Pin by Pete Comley (FO)
5. Hound Dog Blues by Virginia Brown (NG)
6. The Top Ten Leadership Commandments by Hans Finzel (NG)
8. Rise by Yosef Gotlieb (NG)

Blog updates completed

1. Tuesday Totals – I’m on Number 8
2. Bookish Funny Friday – 15th posted
3. Waiting on Wednesday – 2nd posted
4. Released Next Month – 2nd posted

Blog Updates Planned

1. Review Policy – mostly written, partly typed
2. Reviews: My thoughts and philosophy – written, partly typed
3. Tuesday Totals – explanation page to be written, a logo would be nice, but not sure what (and how)
4. Rose’s Ramblings – explanation page to be written, logo to be created; two posts written, need to be typed (was Monthly Musings, but I decided that keeping it random was better!)
5. Blog Improvements – section needed with to do list
6. Visitor Counters – need to add them!

I’m gradually making progress with blog updates and reviews.  I’m hoping to join Bloggiesta this year and get some of my updates done then. Having this list to come back to is useful as it keeps me on track and stops me heading off in random directions! 🙂
What do you have planned for your blog?  How do you decide which book to read next???

Released next month: Shift by Kim Curran

Due for Release in September 2012

Shift by Kim Curran

ShiftShift by Kim Curran

When your average, 16-year old loser, Scott Tyler, meets the beautiful and mysterious Aubrey Jones, he learns he’s not so average after all. He’s a ‘Shifter’. And that means he has the power to undo any decision he’s ever made. At first, he thinks the power to shift is pretty cool. But as his world starts to unravel around him he realises that each time he uses his power, it has consequences; terrible unforeseen consequences. Shifting is going to get him killed. In a world where everything can change with a thought, Scott has to decide where he stands.

UK Print
Date: 6th September 2012
ISBN: 9781908844033
Format: Medium Paperback
R.R.P.: £7.99

US/CAN Print
Date: 4th September 2012
ISBN: 9781908844040
Format: Large Paperback
R.R.P.: $9.99

Ebook
Date: 4th September 2012
ISBN: 9781908844057
Format: Epub & Mobi
R.R.P.: £5.49 / $6.99

UK Print & Ebook
Amazon.co.uk | Book Depository | Waterstones | WHSmith

US Print & Ebook
Amazon.com | BarnesandNoble.com | IndieBound.org

Published by Strange Chemistry, Shift sounds to be a facinating time travel novel; I enjoy the mental juggling involved in dealing with the paradoxes that can result from time travel.  I wasn’t lucky enough to win a copy on Goodreads, so I’m going to buy myself a copy (if I can’t persuade someone to buy it for me as a present!).  With the striking cover art, I think I’ll be looking for a physical copy, rather than an ebook.

The Assassin’s Curse by Cassandra Rose Clarke: review

The Assassin's Curse (The Assassin's Curse, #1)The Assassin’s Curse by Cassandra Rose Clarke
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Ananna of the Tanarau abandons ship when her parents try to marry her off to an allying pirate clan: she wants to captain her own boat, not serve as second-in-command to her handsome yet clueless fiance. But her escape has dire consequences when she learns the scorned clan has sent an assassin after her.

And when the assassin, Naji, finally catches up with her, things get even worse. Ananna inadvertently triggers a nasty curse — with a life-altering result. Now Ananna and Naji are forced to become uneasy allies as they work together to break the curse and return their lives back to normal. Or at least as normal as the lives of a pirate and an assassin can be.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

How good is The Assassin’s Curse? It’s so good I read it in a day!

The Assassin’s Curse is an otherworld fantasy story that can hold its own with the best of the genre. The Assassin’s Curse has about it the feel of Robin Hobb – although this instalment is shorter than one of a Robin Hobb trilogy, however, I suspect that there will be four or five books in this series (if you read The Assassin’s Curse, let me know if you agree!). Since I really want to know what happens next and how Ananna and Naji deal with the challenges they’ve been given, I shall be keeping a watch on Strange Chemistry’s blog for the next in series, although since The Assassin’s Curse isn’t released until October 2012, I suspect I will have a bit of a wait!

The story begins with our heroine running away from her betrothing ceremony – and I can’t say I blame her. Thus begin her adventures and her meeting with the eponymous assassin. One of the things that I particularly liked was that  it has a strong female lead. It’s funny how fantasy books much more often have strong, independent female leads than a number of other genres. Perhaps that’s why I’ve read fantasy (and Sci-Fi) books since I was a girl. One of my favourite authors was Andre Norton; Ms Clarke is most definitely in Ms Norton’s league.

The adventures the pair of unwilling co-travellers share follow logically from one to another, although there were a few points when I felt there was a tad too much running around without purpose and without Ananna and Naji growing further. I think there may have been some over-exuberant editing or revising around the storm sequence, since the plot progression got a little mushy around there. For me, a veteran of many sail-era naval novels, the lack of detail in, and slightly inaccurate, telling of the actions on board ship (I am being intentionally vague to avoid giving any of the story away) was a minor irritation – a very minor one. I would have liked more details about the Isles of the Sky – my mental pictures there was rather sketchy.

The telling of the developing relationship between Ananna and Naji is mostly well done – and I enjoyed that it is not too much of a formulaic romance. All of the characters are well drawn and believable. I hope we meet the wizard again – he is a character with much potential.

I thoroughly enjoyed The Assassin’s Curse and found the standard of world building by Ms Clarke to be well executed. I would have liked a little more detail on the various peoples and their cultures & religions to be worked into the tale. Had the book been somewhat longer, this and the other additions I have mentioned could have been included. The key to adding these details is to do it as part of the story and not for the author to tell the reader directly. I suspect that the publishers, Strange Chemistry, have a standrd format in which they publish and that the books they publish are edited to this format. I hope that as time goes by, they are able to offer a range of book formats (i.e. lengths).

I really liked the cover…the script’s font and the skyline are reminiscent of ancient Arabia and get the reader in the right frame of mind for the world they are about to visit.

I think this is a debut novel for Cassandra Rose Clarke and I have great hopes for her future books.

I thank Strange Chemistry for my opportunity to read The Assassin’s Curse, as a NetGalley ARC for kindle. I also thank them for introducing me to a new (to me) author. Details of the release dates for The Assassin’s Curse can be found in my WOW post.

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View all my Goodreads reviews

I’m claiming this book as No. 121/150 in the Goodreads 2012 Reading Challenge; and No. 6 in the First in Series Reading challenge..
[All links in right hand sidebar]

I particularly liked was that

Tuesday Totals (7) 2012: Week 32

Tuesday Totals – 06 to 12 August 2012

Here is my weekly round-up of my blog activities – accomplished and planned – that I use to try to keep myself on track, focused and with a sense of achievement! There are seven sections of activities; this post details their status for the weeks 06 to 12 August 2012.

Currently Reading

The books I’m reading as I post.

1. Cameron Nation by David Carraturo (AG)

This is going on the back burner for a few weeks; I have some other books that have run up the list.

2. Luke Wood presents More than a Million Words by Luke Wood and others (FR)

I think a few of these before bed will be a nice treat.  I try not to read too many in one go, so I can savour each piece.

3. Wolf Dawn by Susan Cartwright (AG)

The story is totally absorbing – I had to stop right in the middle of a very exciting bit to go to work this morning. The writing style is a little ponderous, but the universe buildong is good.

4. The Consul at Sunset by Gerald Hanley

I know this is a product of its time, and looking back to see how far we’ve come is a useful exercise, but the attitude to women and “foreigners” is shocking!

Finished This week

1. Desperate Housedogs / Get Fluffy by Abbey Sparkle (NG)

I have read Desperate Housedogs before (it’s one of my early reviews) however, when I received it in a two volume NetGalley ARC with its sequel Get Fluffy, I thought I’d do a quick reread. Enjoying the second time through!!

2. Poltergeeks by Simon Cummings (NG)

I I really enjoyed this

3. The Assassin’s Curse by Cassandra Rose Clarke (NG)

Amazing, brilliant book.

Reviews in Manuscript

I like writing with a pen (or pencil) and paper. In addition, it is more convenient to write by hand, since in the time available, I don’t have access to a computer 🙂
Look out for these reviews coming soon:

1. Defying Drakon by Carole Mortimer
2. Hot Girl’s Friend by Lisa Scott
3. The First Rule of Ten by Gay Hendricks & Tinker Lindsey (40% typed)
4. Scarlett’s by A. L. Collins
5. The Serpent Sea by Martha Wells
6. The Wedding Story by Dee Tenorio
7. Little Girls: A Novella by Elton Lord
8. Unforgettable Embrace by Joanne Clancy
9. Dead(ish) by Naomi Kramer
10. A Vampire’s Dominon by V. M. K. Fewings
11. Bone Machine by C. N. James
12. Columbus Avenue Boys by David Carraturo
13. Catestrophically Consequential by Stephen C. Bird
14. The Hero’s Guide to Saving Your Kingdom by Christopher Healy
15. Darker by Degree by Keri Knutson & Susan Branham
16. Sanctuary by Glyn Smith-Wild
17. Seven into the Bleak by Matthew Iden
18. Redhead by Ian Cook
19. Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein
20. The Assassin’s Curse by Cassandra Rose Clarke

Reviews Posted

 Poltergeeks by Simon Cummings

TBR Shortlist

I’ve had a rethink on choosing my next book.  I have been approved for quite a number of NetGalley (NG) book, so I’ve decided it’s time to boost some of these up the list and get posting reviews!  The other books from my list generally come under the headings of author gifts (AG), which usually get priority; First Reads (FR) wins; and authors’ time limited free offers (FO).  I sprinkle in some bought books and free ebooks too, as I fancy.

My immediate reading list is:

1. Timepiece by Myra McEntire (NG)
2. For That Day by Low Kay Hwa (AG)
3. One Moment by Kristina McBride (NG)
4. Monkey with a Pin by Pete Comley (FO)
5. Hound Dog Blues by Virginia Brown (NG)
6. The River Witch by Kimberly Brock (NG)
7. The Top Ten Leadership Commandments by Hans Finzel (NG)
8. Rise by Yosef Gotlieb (NG)

Blog updates completed

1. Tuesday Totals – I’m on Number 7
2. Bookish Funny Friday – 14th posted
3. Waiting on Wednesday – 1st posted
4. Released Next Month – 1st posted

Blog Updates Planned

1. Review Policy – mostly written, partly typed
2. Reviews: My thoughts and philosophy – written, partly typed
3. Tuesday Totals – explanation page to be written, a logo would be nice, but not sure what (and how)
4. Rose’s Ramblings – explanation page to be written, logo to be created; two posts written, need to be typed (was Monthly Musings, but I decided that keeping it random was better!)
5. Blog Improvements – section needed with to do list
6. Visitor Counters – need to add them!

I’m gradually making progress with blog updates and reviews.  I’m hoping to join Bloggiesta this year and get some of my updates done then. Having this list to come back to is useful as it keeps me on track and stops me heading off in random directions! 🙂
What do you have planned for your blog?  How do you decide which book to read next???

Released next month: Blackwood by Gwenda Bond

Due for Release in September 2012

Blackwood by Gwenda Bond

BlackwoodBlackwood by Gwenda Bond

On Roanoke Island, the legend of the 114 people who mysteriously vanished from the Lost Colony hundreds of years ago is just an outdoor drama for the tourists, a story people tell. But when the island faces the sudden disappearance of 114 people now, an unlikely pair of 17-year-olds may be the only hope of bringing them back.

Miranda, a misfit girl from the island’s most infamous family, and Phillips, an exiled teen criminal who hears the voices of the dead, must dodge everyone from federal agents to long-dead alchemists as they work to uncover the secrets of the new Lost Colony. The one thing they can’t dodge is each other.

Blackwood is a dark, witty coming of age story that combines America’s oldest mystery with a thoroughly contemporary romance.

UK Print
Date: 6th September 2012
ISBN: 9781908844064
Format: Medium Paperback
R.R.P.: £7.99

US/CAN Print
Date: 4th September 2012
ISBN: 9781908844071
Format: Large Paperback
R.R.P.: $9.99

Ebook
Date: 4th September 2012
ISBN: 9781908844088
Format: Epub & Mobi
R.R.P.: £5.49 / $6.99

UK Print & Ebook
Amazon.co.uk | Book Depository | Waterstones | WHSmith

US Print & Ebook
Amazon.com | BarnesandNoble.com | IndieBound.org

Published by Strange Chemistry, Blackwood sounds to be just the kind of sci-fi/fantasy novel I enjoy, and have been reading for some time.  I wasn’t lucky enough to win a copy on Goodreads, so I’m going to buy myself a copy.  With the lovely cover art, I think I’ll be looking for a physical copy, rather than an ebook.

Poltergeeks by Sean Cummings: review

PoltergeeksPoltergeeks by Sean Cummings

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

15-year-old Julie Richardson is about to learn that being the daughter of a witch isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. When she and her best friend, Marcus, witness an elderly lady jettisoned out the front door of her home, it’s pretty obvious to Julie there’s a supernatural connection.

In fact, there’s a whisper of menace behind increasing levels of poltergeist activity all over town. After a large-scale paranormal assault on Julie’s high school, her mother falls victim to the spell Endless Night. Now it’s a race against time to find out who is responsible or Julie won’t just lose her mother’s soul, she’ll lose her mother’s life.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Poltergeeks is a YA witch-themed fantasy novel that will appeal to fantasy fans of all ages. It is a fast-paced and absorbing. book I really didn’t want to put Poltergeeks down, but I had to do that in order to sleep.

Sean Cummings spins a fabulous yarn, with vivid descriptions of the phenomena and battles. The various relationships are described in realistic terms; I felt that all of them rang true and were consistent throughout the book. I’m very impressed at how well this middle-aged Blackburn Rovers fan got inside a 15-year-old girl’s head. Or should I be worried…LOL…seriously, whilst reading Poltergeeks I imagined a female author, the “voice” was that good.

There are a few really clichéd phrases uttered by the characters, along with some pretty cringeworthy phrases, but somehow they fit. Marcus is a stereotypical geek, and is bullied by a stereotypical jock, but I found I was able to ignore those formulaic bits. The witchy parts of the book are well worked out, and consistent. The story itself is internally consistent: it is set in the Calgary of the here and now – how wonderful to have a book set outside the US! There’s nothing wrong with the US, it’s just nice to be treated to a different locale – and takes the view that magic is all around us but most people don’t notice it. Witches are charged with keeping the rest of humanity safe from the “bad guys”. These two aspects – normal everyday and magical – are expertly woven together. Since Julie, our heroine, has been kept in the dark about many magical society details for most of her life, we learn about the rich details of the society with her. This kept the book interesting; I wanted to know more, I made guesses based on the clues received so far and was not bored when we got to the explanations because they happened as part of the story, either as direct speech or as part of the action rather than large passages of exposition directly from the author to the reader.

Poltergeeks absolutely races along, sometimes leaving the reader almost out of breath; there are few points where the reader thinks “Ah! I can put the book down knowing all are safe for a bit”. I admit that partway through, I worked out who – but I didn’t see the why. This looping interweaving sleight-of-hand part of the book was wonderfully woven.

In addition to discovering a new (to me) author, I’ve also discovered a new imprint: Strange Chemistry, who have some fantastic books coming out over the next six months – keep your eyes open for them: check out my WoW posts for details. Details of the release dates of Poltergeeks are also given on the website.

Thank you Sean for an excellent read. Thank you Strange Chemistry for approving me to receive a NetGalley ARC of Poltergeeks. I thoroughly enjoyed it and look forward to subsequent books.

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View all my Goodreads reviews

I’m claiming this book as No. 120/150 in the Goodreads 2012 Reading Challenge; and No. 5 in the First in Series Reading challenge..
[All links in right hand sidebar]

The First Rule of Ten by Gay Hendricks & Tinker Lindsay: review

The First Rule of Ten: A Tenzing Norbu Mystery The First Rule of Ten: A Tenzing Norbu Mystery by Gay Hendricks

Tenzing Norbu (“Ten” for short)–ex-monk and soon-to-be ex-cop–is a protagonist unique to our times. In “The First Rule of Ten,” the first installment in a three-book detective series, readers meet this spiritual warrior who is singularly equipped, if not occasionally ill-equipped, as he takes on his first case as a private investigator in Los Angeles.

*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

I sent out a request to the Universe that I might be allow to win this book – and it was with much gratitude that I received this book as a First Reads prize.

I really wanted to read The First Rule of Ten when it arrived but practised a little delayed gratification as I completed some overdue reviews and read some author-gifted books I had agreed to review. Then finally, I could wait no longer. Once I started the book, I found it difficult to put down and after a couple of restrained sessions, I polished off the majority of the book in four hours one Saturday morning.

The First Rule of Ten is superbly written, peopled with detailed, well-drawn characters and has a multi-layered ‘who is the puppeteer pulling the strings?’ plot that moves along at a clip but without leaving the reader behind.

The whole concept of a Buddhist ex-monk (the term ex-Buddhist monk didn’t ring true to me, since Ten is clearly still a Buddhist at heart) who becomes an LAPD cop was so intriguing – and the explanation of his journey from one to another is gradually uncovered and expanded throughout the book. It is a delightful and realistic reveal that would happen if you actually met Ten. He is a warm and compassionate human being, who although flawed (aren’t we all?!) is aware, thanks to his monk’s training, of how these flaws are made manifest., He therefore works to guard against many of them, whilst accepting and acknowledging others, such as his love of his car.

The reader is able to learn from Ten, but the lessons are those of observation and never stray into that annoying realm where authors, via their characters, preaches at the reader. Instead, here the lessons are laid out in front of us and, like those presented by life, it is for us to choose to learn from them. It is well, in this situation, to remember, as we learn from the book, the First Rule of Ten: Don’t ignore the tickle …

This is an excellent book on all front and I am grateful to have read it. I thank the authors for making the book available through First Reads and the universe/random winner generator for picking me!

I’m claiming this book as No. 84/150 in the Goodreads 2012 Reading Challenge;  and No.4 in the First in Series Reading challenge..
[Links in right hand sidebar]

Tuesday Totals (6) 2012: Week 31

Tuesday Totals – 30 July to 05 August 2012

Here is my weekly round-up of my blog activities – accomplished and planned – that I use to try to keep myself on track, focused and with a sense of achievement! There are seven sections of activities; this post details their status for the weeks 30 July to 05 August 2012.
This post is rather long because, as I explained in the last TT, real life rather got the better of me for a bit and I’m playing catch-up!

Currently Reading

The books I’m reading as I post.

1. Cameron Nation by David Carraturo (AG)

This is going on the back burner for a few weeks; I have some other books that have run up the list.

2. Luke Wood presents More than a Million Words by Luke Wood and others (FR)

I think a few of these before bed will be a nice treat.  I try not to read too many in one go, so I can savour each piece.

3. Desperate Housedogs / Get Fluffy by Abbey Sparkle (NG)

I have read Desperate Housedogs before (it’s one of my early reviews) however, when I received it in a two volume NetGalley ARC with its sequel Get Fluffy, I thought I’d do a quick reread. Enjoying the second time through!!

Finished This week

1. The Great Firewall by Michael C. Boxall (AG)

The book started and ended strongly, but I felt it was a little repetative in the middle.

2. Confusous Cat Says by P. R. Mason

I enjoyed this homage to great quotes!

3. Short Fuses by Stephen Leather

I’ve read one of Mr Leather’s other short Stories about Inspector Zhang, so was pleased to find one here too. All four stories are well crafted. There are lots of “first two” chapters for his novels. I read a few – they look good – but got fed up reading so many starts.

3. White Cougar Christmas by Elixa Gayle

Not particularly impressed. There wasn’t enough world building and I’m not inspired to read the novels in the series from which this short story comes.

Reviews in Manuscript

I like writing with a pen (or pencil) and paper. In addition, it is more convenient to write by hand, since in the time available, I don’t have access to a computer 🙂
Look out for these reviews coming soon:

1. Defying Drakon by Carole Mortimer
2. Hot Girl’s Friend by Lisa Scott
3. The First Rule of Ten by Gay Hendricks & Tinker Lindsey (40% typed)
4. Scarlett’s by A. L. Collins
5. The Serpent Sea by Martha Wells
6. The Wedding Story by Dee Tenorio
7. Little Girls: A Novella by Elton Lord
8. Unforgettable Embrace by Joanne Clancy
9. Dead(ish) by Naomi Kramer
10. A Vampire’s Dominon by V. M. K. Fewings
11. Bone Machine by C. N. James
12. Columbus Avenue Boys by David Carraturo
13. Catestrophically Consequential by Stephen C. Bird
14. The Hero’s Guide to Saving Your Kingdom by Christopher Healy
15. Darker by Degree by Keri Knutson & Susan Branham
16. Sanctuary by Glyn Smith-Wild
17. Seven into the Bleak by Matthew Iden
18. Redhead by Ian Cook
18. Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

Reviews Posted

1. Salsa Invertebraxa by Mozchops

TBR Shortlist

I’ve had a rethink on choosing my next book.  I have been approved for quite a number of NetGalley (NG) book, so I’ve decided it’s time to boost some of these up the list and get posting reviews!  The other books from my list generally come under the headings of author gifts (AG), which usually get priority; First Reads (FR) wins; and authors’ time limited free offers (FO).  I sprinkle in some bought books and free ebooks too, as I fancy.

My immediate reading list is:

1. Poltergeeks by Sean cummings (NG)
2. The Assassin’s Curse by Cassandra Rose Clarke (NG)
3. Timepiece by Myra McEntire (NG)
4. Wolf Dawn by Susan Cartwright (AG)
5. For That Day by Low Kay Hwa (AG)
6. One Moment by Kristina McBride (NG)
7. Monkey with a Pin by Pete Comley (FO)
8. Hound Dog Blues by Virginia Brown (NG)
9. The River Witch by Kimberly Brock (NG)
10. The Top Ten Leadership Commandments by Hans Finzel (NG)
11. Rise by Yosef Gotlieb (NG)

Blog updates completed

1. Tuesday Totals – I’m on Number 6!
2. Bookish Funny Friday – 13th posted, 14th scheduled

Blog Updates Planned

1. Review Policy – mostly written, partly typed
2. Reviews: My thoughts and philosophy – written, partly typed
3. Tuesday Totals – explanation page to be written, a logo would be nice, but not sure what (and how)
4. Rose’s Ramblings – explanation page to be written, logo to be created; two posts written, need to be typed (was Monthly Musings, but I decided that keeping it random was better!)
5. Blog Improvements – section needed with to do list
6. Visitor Counters – need to add them!

I’m gradually making progress with blog updates and reviews.  I’m hoping to join Bloggiesta this year and get some of my updates done then. Having this list to come back to is useful as it keeps me on track and stops me heading off in random directions! 🙂
What do you have planned for your blog?  How do you decide which book to read next???

Cover Art Announced: Pantomime by Laura Lam

Cover Art announced for
Pantomime by Laura Lam

Publishers Strange Chemistry have unveiled the preliminary cover art work, by Tom Bagshaw, for Laura Lam’s latest book, Pantomime.

I think this is a very striking image, its simplicity giving it maximum impact.  As the publishers remark, the title and author’s name still need to be added; I hope that these are in sympathy with the image and don’t lessen its impact.

Here is the blurb for the book:

R.H. Ragona’s Circus of Magic is the greatest circus of Ellada. Nestled among the glowing blue Penglass – remnants of a mysterious civilisation long gone – are wonders beyond the wildest imagination. It’s a place where anything seems possible, where if you close your eyes you can believe that the magic and knowledge of the vanished Chimaeras is still there. It’s a place where anyone can hide.

Iphigenia Laurus, or Gene, the daughter of a noble family, is uncomfortable in corsets and crinoline, and prefers climbing trees to debutante balls. Micah Grey, a runaway living on the streets, joins the circus as an aerialist’s apprentice and soon becomes the circus’s rising star. But Gene and Micah have balancing acts of their own to perform, and a secret in their blood that could unlock the mysteries of Ellada.

I think Pantomime sounds intriguing, mysterious and magical. I shall be hunting this one down when it’s published in February 2013!